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Home page > Seminars > Séminaires théorie > Theory Club Wednesday January 20th at 16h45 (Zoom). Lisa Manning: " What allows cells in dense tissues to move? And what stops them from moving?".

Theory Club Wednesday January 20th at 16h45 (Zoom). Lisa Manning: " What allows cells in dense tissues to move? And what stops them from moving?"

Unless otherwise stated, seminars and defences take place at 11:30 in room 454A of Condorcet building.


What allows cells in dense tissues to move? And what stops them from moving?

Abstract:

In multicellular organisms, properly programmed collective motion is required to form tissues and organs, and this programming breaks down in diseases like cancer. Recent experimental work highlights that some organisms tune the global mechanical properties of a tissue across a fluid-solid transition to allow or prohibit cell motion and control processes such as body axis elongation. What is the physical origin of such rigidity transitions? Are they similar to jamming or glass transitions in particulate/molecular matter, which are the canonical disordered rigidity transitions in condensed matter physics, or are they different? In this talk I will highlight three mechanisms for collective cell arrest: 1) crowding, 2) a generalization of tensegrity, and 3) decreasing fluctuations, and discuss our recent work to develop theoretical frameworks for each possibility and tease apart which mechanism(s) are operating in a given system. I’ll discuss specific examples from fruit fly development, cultured epithelia layers, and spheroid/ECM interactions.

Wednesday 20th of January at 16h45 (Zoom)


Contact : Équipe séminaires / Seminar team - Published on / Publié le 5 March


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