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Accueil du site > Séminaires > Archives séminaires > Séminaires 2016 > Séminaire MSC. 7 novembre 2016. François Robin (Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine) :" Organizing embryonic contractility in space and time" .

Séminaire MSC. 7 novembre 2016. François Robin (Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine) :" Organizing embryonic contractility in space and time"

Sauf mention contraire, les séminaires et les soutenances se déroulent à 11h30 en salle 454A du bâtiment Condorcet.


Organizing embryonic contractility in space and time

François Robin, ATIP/AVENIR Group Leader Cortical Actomyosin Dynamics in Development and Morphogenesis (CADMO) Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine Laboratoire de Biologie du Développement.

JPEG - 71.2 ko

The actomyosin cytoskeleton is a major determinant of the mechanical properties of embryonic cells and tissues. Spatial and temporal modulations of these properties define the mechanical landscape that drives morphogenesis. Over the past 20 years, the combination of imaging an embryology has proved an extremely powerful tool to dissect the dynamics of morphogenesis across scales, from tissue to cell and molecules. Here, I will present two stories that exemplify this "multiscale dynamics".

In the first study, we focused on neural tube closure in a basal Chordate, Ciona intestinalis, and showed that local activation of myosin caused a local increase in junctional tension. A dynamic imbalance in tissue resistance then converted this local contractile tension into asymmetrical junction shortening, unidirectional zipper progression and closure of the neural tube. To gain more insight on the molecular bases of actomyosin contractility, we used a different model system, the nematode worm C. elegans. We established a technique to image and track single-molecules at the cell surface, then extract kinetic and kinematic properties of cortical proteins. We then used this technique to gain some insight into the molecular bases of contractility during dynamic contractile events.

In conclusion, I will argue that the next step that we need to further understand embryonic morphogenesis is to to bridge in vivo the gaps between description of cellular biochemistry, the mechanical properties of the actomyosin cortex at the cell scale, and emergent properties at the tissue scale.


Contact : Équipe séminaires / Seminar team - Published on / Publié le 24 octobre 2016


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